Bone Broth

Bone broth and rendered fatWhy broth?

Properly prepared bone broth is a source of bio-available minerals, supports digestion and contains easily assimilated amino acids; it contains proteins that support bone and joint health.

Quick tips on preparation

Prepare bone broth in high-quality cookware (pots or crock pots) free of aluminum and lead. Using small bones, joints, skin, cartilage, heads, feet, etc. means your broth will contain more healing nutrients.

If preparing bone broth for a child with ADHD or autism spectrum disorder, start by simmering for 2-3 hours and gradually increase simmer time with each new batch as tolerated. Stick with a shorter simmer time if your child seems overstimulated or restless after consuming the broth.

Basic chicken/duck/turkey stock

Take a whole bird (organic and pasture-raised from a reputable source, preferably with head and feet still on, and checking the cavities to make sure to remove any plastic baggies with gizzards inside. Gizzards, if available, will add to the nutrient content of your broth). Place bird in a large pot with roughly chopped vegetables: 1-2 organic onions, 2 organic carrots, 1-2 sticks of organic celery, 1-2 organic potatoes with skins on (potato skin supplies potassium), 3-4 bay leaves and about 1 gallon of filtered water or spring water. Bring to a boil. Cover and simmer 4-6 hours. Let cool and then strain through a metal colander, then store in freezer-safe glass containers. Pick the meat off the bones and use for stews, soups, curries, casseroles, tacos and more.

You can also make bone broth in a crock pot. Here’s how: http://nourishedkitchen.com/perpetual-soup-the-easiest-bone-broth-youll-make/

Basic beef/lamb/goat stock

Take five pounds of organic and grass-fed beef, lamb or goat bones from a reputable source and put them in a large pot with 1-2 roughly chopped organic onions, 2 organic carrots, 1-2 sticks of organic celery, 1-2 organic potatoes with skins on, 3-4 bay leaves and about 1 gal filtered water or spring water. Bring to a boil. Cover and simmer 4-8 hours (you can also simmer in a crock pot). Add one bunch of freshly chopped organic parsley during last 10 minutes. Let cool, then strain through a metal colander. Store in freezer-safe glass containers. You can use the stock plain or as a base for preparing vegetables, quinoa, legumes, etc. Pick the meat off the bones and use for stews, soups, curries, casseroles, tacos and more.

See also: Fish stock recipe: http://www.cheeseslave.com/fish-stock/

So I’ve made a big pot of broth. Now what?

First of all, don’t panic. Broth is very versatile and can be used in numerous cooking applications. See my tips on using and storing broth to learn more. Check out my split pea soup recipe as well. You can enjoy it creamy or chunky. You can even make it into crackers as a convenient snack or travel food, as a way to sneak broth into picky eaters!

Can I give broth to my baby or toddler?

Yes, you sure can, as part of a balanced diet that includes a wide range of nutrients appropriate to your little one’s ages and developmental stages. See my recipes and serving suggestions for babies and toddlers here.

 

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